Dragon Age: Inquisition by Bio-Ware

“Magic, sword fights, politics, hard choices, hilarious/thoughtful/moving banter, and romance. This is a 2014 game and remains my favorite.” – Kelly K., Circulation

Mages, once confined to towers with their magic constantly supervised and often brutally punished by the Chantry’s Templar Order, have rebelled. A civil war is brewing. Peace minded mages and clergy meet to discuss terms… but are massacred by an explosion so powerful that it tears a hole in the sky. As the blast’s sole survivor, only you and your team can bring the world back from the brink of destruction. Gorgeous openworld game, choice-based action and consequences, lots of humor, and 8 different romance-able characters to woo. (PS4, XBOX 360, XBOX ONE)

But You Seemed So Happy: A Marriage in Pieces and Bits by Kimberly Harrington

“I took this book with me several times to restaurants to read the chapter “And You May Ask Yourself, Well, How Did I Get Here?” to friends. We laughed, as it is supposed to be humorous, but mostly we sat there stunned at the end of the chapter as Kimberly outlines the sixteen steps of the “experiment” that marriage REALLY consists of, in a way that I’ve never seen before, meaning, spot-on.” – Kelly, Kids Room

Digging into the history of her 20 years of marriage, Kimberly manages to explain what went right, what went wrong, and why women shouldn’t continue to feel bad for wanting more.

A Pizza With Everything on It by Kyle Scheele & Andy J. Pizza

“It’s pizza. It’s jokes. It’s even a little bit sciencey. It’s also Kyle Scheele, who I was delighted to find was the same guy I follow on social media. This is a hilariously high-energy and silly read that I think would make a fantastic Mystery Reader picture book (or read-out-loud-together-at-home book) for a hilarious, high-energy, and silly reader!” – DG Library Staff

What happens when your dad owns a pizza shop? You can put anything you want on a pizza! But, what if you try to add *literally* everything?

The Witch King by H.E. Edgmon

“First, I laughed until I cried. Then, I cried until I cried more. This one was life-changing for me personally. Imagine if She-Ra & the Princesses of Power was rated R and told from Catra’s POV? (Except I love Wyatt far, far more.)” – Kelly K., Circulation

In Asalin, fae rule and witches serve… or worse. Wyatt’s betrothal to Emyr was meant to change all that, but instead he fled to the human world. Despite transgender Wyatt’s newfound identity and troubling past, Emyr tracks him down and claims they must marry to avert civil war back home. Jaded, Wyatt strikes a deal with the enemy, hoping to escape Asalin forever. But as the witches face worsening conditions, he must decide what’s more important – his own freedom or his people’s.

Maya and the Robot by Eve L. Ewing

“With a great sense of place–Chicago, no less, and relatable characters, this is an enjoyable read about following your passions and finding your voice.” – Lora, Kids Room

With her two best friends in a different 5th-grade class, Maya figures it’s going to be a bummer of a school year. But her discovery of a robot named Ralph might help change that.

The New One: Painfully True Stories from a Reluctant Dad by Mike Birbiglia and J. Hope Stein

“If you are a parent, read it (you will probably feel better about yourself afterward). If you never want to become a parent, read it (it will reaffirm your decision to not have children). If you were ever an infant, read it (you will realize how much you changed your parent’s life).” – Kelly, Kids Room

Funny yet emotionally raw confessions about being a new parent.

Wow, no thank you: essays by Samantha Irby

“I could so relate to these hilarious essays and am convinced the author and I would become immediate best friends upon meeting, or at least exchange mixtapes.” – Gracie, Kids Room

A collection of self-deprecating and humorous essays from an anxious forty-something that finds herself stuck in the middle of a small Midwest town. Literal laugh-out-loud observations of the every day from Samantha Irby.

Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End by Naughty Dog

“I’m a married woman in my 30s, and my husband and I (like Nate and Elena) often wonder whether life is merely a series of bills to be paid. Uncharted 4 resonated with me on so many levels. The globe-trotting is thrilling, the scenery is gorgeous, the puzzles and secret passages are atmospheric. There are car chases, cliff-scaling, (non-gore-y) gunfights, consistently funny quips and banter, bro-time with the guys, and romance. It’s Indiana Jones + Tomb Raider + Jason Bourne + Pirates of the Caribbean (the 1st one, of course!) all rolled into one. But more than that, it’s a cinematic story about being yourself while accepting new phases of your life.” – Kelly, Circulation

Nathan Drake is an ex-treasure-hunter who’s been out of the game for years. Though his marriage to journalist Elena is a happy one, the tedium of staying in one place is wearing him down. He eagerly throws himself back into an adventure to help someone from his past… even if that means lying to his wife and putting himself and (fan-favorite) Victor “Sully” Sullivan back into bad guys’ cross-hairs.

Stand Up, Yumi Chung! by Jessica Kim

“Stand Up, Yumi Chung! is a feel-good, laugh-out-loud story for middle-grade readers that has plenty of appeal for older readers as well. Anyone who has struggled with finding their voice, especially without their family’s support, can identify with the story’s message. The writing features tender and humorous moments between Yumi and her parents without veering into stereotypes or caricatures. Readers are touchingly reminded that we must overcome our fear of failure, not failure itself.” – Van, Adult & Teen Services

Readers follow Yumi, a shy young Korean girl who loves stand-up comedy but her immigrant parents would rather she concentrate on school.

Disgusting Critters Series by Elise Gravel

“Elise Gravel’s cute illustration style immediately caught my eye, and the way she presents the information has me hooked! I love insects, bats, and other critters often considered “creepy”. But for younger readers with more average interests, Gravel takes away a whole lot of the gross, and replaces it with funny! The whole series (10 books so far- The Fly, The Slug, The Rat, The Worm, The Spider, Head Lice, The Toad, The Bat, The Cockroach, and The Mosquito) does a great job presenting non-fiction in a fun, and easy to read, way.” – DGPL Staff

Elise Gravel’s Disgusting Critters series is an eye-catchingly cute and very silly non-fiction introduction to a number of gross, sometimes misunderstood, creepy creatures- including rats, spiders, worms, and cockroaches!