The Lake House by Kate Morton

“This book really held my interest with a lot of plot twists.” – Mary, Circulation

A riveting story set in two time periods surrounding the disappearance of a young boy. It kept me guessing until the end!

Felix Ever After by Kacen Callender

“This is a book about learning who you are and learning to love who you are and not needing outside validation. You don’t need love to be happy, but it is a nice bonus if you have it. I loved this book because there aren’t enough books out there with this underlying message. Love is not the “end-all-be-all” but this book gives you hope that love is out there and you don’t have to be perfect to get it.” – Gina, Circulation

Felix Love, ironically, has never been in love, but he wants to know what it’s like. He believes that he doesn’t deserve love because he’s “one marginalization too many.” He’s black, queer, and transgender. When an anonymous student publicly outs him by posting old pictures and his name from before he transitioned, Felix wants to find out who did it and get revenge. His revenge plot unexpectedly throws him into a love triangle and everything about his life is suddenly more complicated.

Real Life by Brandon Taylor

“I loved how well Taylor’s writing was able to transport the reader into Wallace’s mind and body and feel his deep alienation, loneliness, desire, and pain. Taylor’s words are poignant and purposeful, and give a powerful voice to so many experiences, feelings, and emotions that ought to be heard.” – Van, Adult & Teen Services

Wallace, a gay, Black biochem graduate student at a predominantly white Midwestern graduate school, navigates tokenism, racism, and biases in academia while struggling with his own internal conflicts and trauma.

Brown by Håkon Øvreås

“Brown has this mostly realistic but slightly magical, totally mundane but kind of absurd feeling to it, that reminds me of Roald Dahl’s stories!” – Lisa, Kids Room

Rusty is having a tough time. His family moved, his grandfather died, and now the local bullies are wrecking his fort! He finds some paint, gathers an all-brown outfit, and becomes BROWN, a superhero who… paints things brown. Can Brown and the other Guardians of the Fort get even, without getting in trouble?

I Killed Zoe Spanos by Kit Frick

“The alternating perspectives and flashbacks to events throughout the summer create a suspenseful web of mystery and twists. The audio is a full-cast recording and lends itself well to the nature of the storytelling, where the podcast feels like your typical true-crime podcast. As a lover of true crime and the many podcasts that are devoted to the subject, this book was right up my alley and a good read-a-like to Sadie by Courtney Summers.” – Amanda, Adult & Teen Services

When Anna Cicconi arrives in the small Hamptons village of Heron Mills for a summer nanny gig, she has high hopes for a fresh start. What she finds instead is a community on edge after the disappearance of Zoe Spanos, a local girl who has been missing since New Year’s Eve. Anna delves deeper into the mystery, feeling that she is somehow connected to Zoe. Two months later, Zoe’s body is found and Anna is charged with manslaughter, although something still does add up for Martina Green, teen host of the Missing Zoe podcast. Did Anna really kill Zoe? If not, can the truth be uncovered?

The Story of Arthur Truluv by Elizabeth Berg

“I loved this short, sweet, well-written book! It is a feel-good book that will make you smile, and the book reminded me of the essential goodness of people. It was a perfect book for the quarantine, and I am looking forward to reading Elizabeth Berg’s next two books in the series.” – Nancy, Adult & Teen Services

Arthur Truluv is a kindhearted, lonely widower who meets Maddy, a troubled teen with a difficult family life, at the cemetery where Arthur’s wife is buried. Arthur and Maddy, along with Arthur’s eccentric neighbor, Lucille, form a friendship and then a family.

Tomb of the Unknown Racist by Blanche McCrary Boyd

“Ellen’s reckless quest to archaeologize (and maybe redeem?) her family’s flawed and tragic history (and her own role in it) is relentlessly readable. Replete with timeless themes of filial responsibility (“Am I my brother’s keeper,” Ellen asks); the notion of a place beyond forgiveness (literally the land of Nod); and the impenetrability of the past. Quirky and compelling.” – DGPL Staff

Ellen Burns’ brother Royce died ten years ago when the FBI raided his white supremacist compound. Or so everyone thought. But when his daughter shows up on the news claiming he’s kidnapped her children, Ellen impulsively travels to New Mexico to decipher the truth about her brother, and her family’s past.

Conversations with Friends by Sally Rooney

“I loved the characters. They are so realistic and so perfectly imperfect!” – Nancy, Adult & Teen Services 

This is the story of Frances and Bobbi, two college students in Dublin, Ireland. Frances is the quiet one, while Bobbi is the beautiful, ebullient one. The novel explores their friendship as well as their friendship with a well-known photographer and the photographer’s husband. Things get complicated when Frances’ relationship with the photographer’s husband crosses a line.

The Black Flamingo by Dean Atta

“This is a beautifully written novel in verse that will speak to anyone looking to find their place in the world.” – Amanda, Adult & Teen Services

A boy comes to terms with his identity as a mixed-race gay teen – then at university he finds his wings as a drag artist, The Black Flamingo. A bold story about the power of embracing your uniqueness. Sometimes, we need to take charge, to stand up wearing pink feathers – to show ourselves to the world in bold color.

Nothing to See Here by Kevin Wilson

“I loved how layered and complex the characters and relationships are.  This short book packs a powerful punch, taking readers on a funny, weird, and poignant ride!” – Van, Adult & Teen Services

Lillian, who has no experience taking care of children, is called upon by a former roommate to take care of twin ten-year-olds for the summer. The kids are easily bored, perpetually hungry, and happen to burst into flames when they get upset.