The Pyrates by George MacDonald Fraser

“The Pyrates has a colorful world ranging from dungeon fortresses to desert islands to native villages. In many ways, it seems like a Saturday morning cartoon for adults.” – Max, IT
The Pyrates is a comical sea adventure during the golden age of piracy. It follows a large cast of over-the-top characters as they each pursue their own goals, some of which may be wealth, noble missions, or romance.

A Ceiling Made of Eggshells by Gail Carson Levine

“Medieval Juvenile historic fiction rarely leaves England. I knew very little about the plight of Sephardic Jews and the Inquisition. Gail Carson Levine explores a story that is close to her family’s history and I found it hard to put down.” – Sharon, Kids Room

Paloma, a Sephardic Jew lives Alcala de Henares, Spain in the reign of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella. Loma is very smart, and her grandfather (Belo) is Don Joseph Cantala, a businessman who is respected by both Jews and Catholics. Loma travels with Belo and learns the art of trading. She also meets Christopher Columbus and Princess Isabella who tries to convert Loma to Catholicism. Loma is clever and loyal and she helps lead her people out of Spain when Jews had three options: leave Spain, convert, or be killed. Ceiling Made of Eggshells is an excellent historical novel.

The Lake House by Kate Morton

“This book really held my interest with a lot of plot twists.” – Mary, Circulation

A riveting story set in two time periods surrounding the disappearance of a young boy. It kept me guessing until the end!

The Nine Tailors by Dorothy L. Sayers

“A classic English mystery, with an eccentric detective, arcane clues, and much ado about bells. It’s like the Moby Dick of bells!” – Fred, Adult & Teen Services

Amateur sleuth Lord Peter Wimsey is pressed into service as a bell ringer in Fenchurch St. Paul when an influenza epidemic decimates the town. But what happens next in the quaint old English village is a crime.

Tomb of the Unknown Racist by Blanche McCrary Boyd

“Ellen’s reckless quest to archaeologize (and maybe redeem?) her family’s flawed and tragic history (and her own role in it) is relentlessly readable. Replete with timeless themes of filial responsibility (“Am I my brother’s keeper,” Ellen asks); the notion of a place beyond forgiveness (literally the land of Nod); and the impenetrability of the past. Quirky and compelling.” – DGPL Staff

Ellen Burns’ brother Royce died ten years ago when the FBI raided his white supremacist compound. Or so everyone thought. But when his daughter shows up on the news claiming he’s kidnapped her children, Ellen impulsively travels to New Mexico to decipher the truth about her brother, and her family’s past.

Dreamland by Nancy Bilyeau

“I love Nancy Bilyeau’s ability to show a beautiful story, peppered with a few thrills that keep the reader guessing until the last few pages. Her evocative setting of early 20th century New York is a perfect escapist read!” – Joy, Adult & Teen Services

Peggy Battenberg is more known for her famous last name than for her love of books and independent streak. Born into a high society New York family at the beginning of the 20th century, Peggy falls in love with a humble artist, but her family may behind the mysterious murders that keep happening at the new amusement park of Coney Island, attempting to drive her and her lover apart.

The Blackbird Girls by Anne Blankman

“Very engaging book from the start with two very well developed characters” – DGPL Staff

An amazing story of two very different 5th grade girls during the Chernobyl Power Station Disaster and how that one night changed their lives forever. The book also covers part of the grandmother’s life during WWII.

The Sixties Trilogy by Deborah Wiles

“News clippings, pictures, and music lyrics of the times bolster this heartfelt narrative.” – DGPL Staff

The Trilogy includes Countdown, Revolution, and Anthem. Each book takes the reader through the not-too-distant past, told in the voice of a young person facing the perilous decade head-on.

A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles

“Count Rostov, the beating heart of this book, is universally appealing in his humane-ness, his loyalty, his quiet erudition, and his self-effacing charm. Great characters, a surprisingly twisty story, and beautiful language combine to make this a classic!” – Fred, Adult & Teen Services

Talk about your champs of social distancing! In 1922, Count Alexander Rostov is sentenced to house arrest (as an unrepentant aristocrat) by a Bolshevik tribunal. The novel is the story of how he spends the next fifty odd years isolated in a simple attic room in a Moscow hotel. Full of history, character, wit and tenderness – a lot happens in that circumscribed world of his!

Akin by Emma Donoghue

“Donoghue’s writing is delightful, unexpected, and a joy to read. If you’ve never picked up a Donoghue novel (author of Room), this is a great one to start!” – Joy, Adult & Teen Services

80-year-old Noah discovers that he’s last next of kin to a surly 12-year-old boy he’s never met, right before he’s supposed to take a trip of a lifetime to Nice, France, to re-discover his parents’ mysterious work in World War II. A wondrously immersive novel filled with complex family relationships and WWII drama.