City of the Plague God by Sarwat Chadda

“For 24 years I’ve walked past the Gilgamesh mural in the DG Library. I know very little about Gilgamesh other than it was one of the first written tales, and it was a fun way to learn about Gilgamesh’s feats and the mythology of Iraq. The threat of a plague shutting down a city felt very current. Also, warrior cats.” Sharon, Kids Room 

Sik Aziz is helping in the family deli when the Mesopotamian plague god Nergal crashes into the deli and demands the treasure Sik’s brother stole from him or he’ll unleash a plague in New York City. Ishtar, the goddess of War, her daughter Belek, and demi-god Gilgamesh help Sik in his quest to save his parents and the city from a terrible plague in this Rick Riordan Presents novel.

Firekeeper’s Daughter by Angeline Boulley

“Boulley tackles so many large ideas including grief and balancing two cultures and identities, but with grace and intrigue as she weaves them with a drug investigation and mystery. I just couldn’t put this book down. The characters are wonderful and there are so many twists to keep you on the edge of your seat. Grab some snacks and hot cocoa and prepare to spend your whole night reading this book!” – Amanda, Adult & Teen Services

Daunis, who is part Ojibwe, defers attending the University of Michigan to care for her mother and reluctantly becomes involved in the investigation of a series of drug-related deaths.

Hockey Night in Kenya by Danson Mutinda

“Looking at this early chapter book, you know it’s probably going to be about a kid playing hockey. But it’s really about the attitude and perseverance of Kitoo, an orphan in Kenya, and the loving support he has from all the people in his life. His struggles are presented with acceptance and a calm tone and softened with his trademark positive thinking. A heartwarming read!” – DG Library Staff

Kitoo and Nigosi, two friends living in a Kenyan orphanage, discover ice hockey and totally love it. Well, love reading about it. Kitoo is pretty sure that it’s too hot for there to be any ice. One day, while helping out the adults who care for them, Kitoo finds a busted old pair of rollerblades. This surprise opens up a new world, and he starts working towards something he thought would have been impossible.

A Chain of Thunder by Jeff Shaara

“Mr. Shaara’s main interest is in the people involved in the battle and the effect it has on their lives. His cast of characters includes the general officers commanding, a common soldier, a female resident of Vicksburg, and a former journalist – now government employee – sent to check on rumors of Grant’s drinking. He crafts a story from multiple view points which is broad enough in scope to attract and hold the attention of the casual, curious reader who knows little about the Civil War while at the same time presenting a story robust enough to hold the interest of readers who are Civil War buffs.” – Karen, Circulation

A Chain of Thunder is the second in a series of four standalone books on battles in the Western Theater written for the sesquicentennial of the American Civil War by Jeff Shaara, a three-time W. Y. Boyd Award winner for excellence in military historical fiction. The Vicksburg campaign ran through the spring and summer of 1863 as Union general Ulysses S. Grant sought the surrender of Vicksburg, Mississippi, the last major Confederate fortress on the Mississippi River. A siege was not Grant’s first choice but became necessary as various other stratagems, including digging a ditch to change the course of the river, went awry. Following weeks of the city’s garrison and civilians living on starvation rations in holes dug in the bluffs due to constant shelling of the town by Union gunboats, Confederate General John Pemberton surrendered the city on July 4, 1863, just one day after the massive battle of Gettysburg back East in Pennsylvania. Being further from the national capital in Washington, D.C., the union victory at Vicksburg has always been overshadowed by Gettysburg even though it could be argued that the fall of Vicksburg had a greater effect on the outcome of the war.

The Snow Fell Three Graves Deep by Allan Wolf

“Very well written and researched, non-judgmental” – Kelly P., Kids Room

The Donner Party like you’ve never heard about it before, told from multiple points of view, including Hunger and the oxen, in addition to the people who suffered through the trip.

 

Home Before Dark by Riley Sager

“I love a good Gothic tale, especially when it involves a haunted house, and this book has it all. It reminds me of Netflix’s version of The Haunting of Hill House, but with its own spin. I could not put it down!” – Katelyn, Administration. 

Maggie returns to her childhood home made famous by her father’s horror memoir. She is determined to find out what really happened the night her family fled the house for good and she resolves to bring to light the secrets, or evil, that is hiding in the house.

Paris is Always a Good Idea by Jenn McKinlay

“Half romance, half relationship fiction, Paris is Always a Good Idea made me smile. Chelsea’s journey took her to some memorable locations. The romantic twists were great to read. This was an excellent romance.” – Sharon, Kids Room 

Seven years after her mother’s death, Chelsea Martin doesn’t respond very well to the news her father is remarrying. When her father suggests she doesn’t remember how to laugh, Chelsea seeks to find the person she was before she learned her mother was ill. This takes her on an adventure through Europe and the three loves of her summer abroad.

A Place at the Table by Saadia Faruqi & Laura Shovan

“Not only was mouth-watering food at the center of this story, I thought Sara and Elizabeth showed that it isn’t always easy to keep up a new friendship. It is something that you have to want and work at all the time.” – Miss. Traci, Kids Room

6th graders Sara and Elizabeth are paired up in an after-school cooking class and don’t exactly hit it off. However, they soon discover that they make good cooking partners and team up to win a spot on a local food show by creating a “mouth-watering cross-cultural dish.” If only it were that easy to connect with one another and become actual friends.

Miss Meteor by Tehlor Kay Mejia and Anna-Marie McLemore

“My first five-star read of 2021! It was sweet, it was funny, it was diverse, and the cast of characters pops. It’s one of those books that I finished and was so happy that it exists.” – Erin, Kids Room

Former best friends Lita and Chicky team up to help Lita win the Miss Meteor pageant–a feat that no girl who looks like either of them has ever done. For Lita, winning the pageant means not fading into stardust (yes, really). For Chicky, it’s a way to save her family’s struggling restaurant. Together, along with the boys they may have feelings for, and Chicky’s opinionated older sisters, they’re determined to prove they can win it all.

I’m Sticking With You by Smriti Prasadam-Halls

“This sweet story became an instant classic in my house. I loved the illustrations and Bears expressions throughout.” – Gracie, Kids Room

“Wherever you’re going, I’m going too. Whatever you’re doing, I’m sticking with you”. It’s a nice idea, but what do you do when you want to be “unstuck” from a friend? Bear and Squirrel are the best of friends but sometimes Bear can just be too much. A great tale about sticking by each other (even after needing a little space).