Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns) by Mindy Kaling

“Mindy auditioned for an Andrew Lloyd Webber musical. (Yes, Mindy Kaling from The Office.) She professionally impersonated Ben Affleck. She used to be a member of a middle school Cheesecake Factory gang of girls. I had to reread multiple chapters because I was laughing too hard the first time.” – Kelly K., Circulation

Mindy Kaling – the obedient, chubster child of immigrant professionals, playwright, and comedy writer/actress – writes a “memoir.” But really, she just makes you feel like she’s in the room with you, reliving her most humiliating failures. And finally, finally, reaching a few goals.

Look! What Do You See? An Art Puzzle Book of American & Chinese Songs by Xu Bing

“I happened upon this book, thought “well, this looks weird”, and set it aside to look at later. It turns out that the entire thing is a brain game, and I love puzzles! It’s clever and unique and totally new to me, and the code even follows a format similar to actual Chinese writing.” – DGPL Staff

At first glance, this book is filled with fancy Chinese calligraphy strangely accompanied by artistic images of traditionally American themes (baseball games, apple trees, and cowboys?). But look closer, and it turns out it’s all written in code, and in English!

Akin by Emma Donoghue

“Donoghue’s writing is delightful, unexpected, and a joy to read. If you’ve never picked up a Donoghue novel (author of Room), this is a great one to start!” – Joy, Adult & Teen Services

80-year-old Noah discovers that he’s last next of kin to a surly 12-year-old boy he’s never met, right before he’s supposed to take a trip of a lifetime to Nice, France, to re-discover his parents’ mysterious work in World War II. A wondrously immersive novel filled with complex family relationships and WWII drama.

The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco

“Clever and immersive, learned and witty, I was drawn into Eco’s ingenious story and warmly drawn characters.” – Fred, Adult & Teen Services

In 1327, scholar-monk Brother William of Baskerville is sent to an isolated Italian abbey to investigate a series of mysterious deaths. He conducts interviews, collects evidence, deciphers arcane symbols and manuscripts, and finally navigates the monastery’s labyrinthine library to confront the evil within.

I Thought My Father Was God by Paul Auster

“I am obsessed with people’s stories and backgrounds and the inner workings of America, especially from years ago.” – Brian, Public Relations

I Thought My Father Was God gathers 180 personal, true-life accounts in a single, powerful volume. They come from people of all ages, backgrounds, and walks of life. Half of the contributors are men; half are women. They live in cities, suburbs, and rural areas, and they come from 42 different states. Most of the stories are short, vivid bits of narrative, combining the ordinary and the extraordinary, and most describe a single incident in the writer’s life.