Well Met by Jen Deluca

“The perfect light-romantic read for nerdy Renaissance Faire fans. Simon is your everyday English teacher hero who is very much the guy next door, and Emily is a lovely relatable heroine.” – Joy, Adult & Teen Services

Emily is just in town to take care of her older sister who’s a single mom recovering from a car accident when she gets wrangled into volunteering for the local Renaissance Faire with her 14-year-old niece. Local English teacher Simon is the grumpy leader of the troupe, who dresses up as a pirate to Emily’s tavern wench character. Hilarious in-character flirty dialogue ensues.

Moon Called by Patricia Briggs.

“With a strong female protagonist and great character development, this book reminded me of Outlander. I’m not normally a fan of fantasy, so I didn’t think I would like the book, but I ended up loving it.” – Amy, Adult & Teen Services/Kids Room

The main character is an auto mechanic who also happens to be a shapeshifter. Other characters include werewolves, vampires, witches, and gremlins

Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know about the People We Don’t Know by Malcolm Gladwell

“An absolutely fascinating look at why it’s so difficult to know the ‘other’” – Julie, Administration

Why are we so bad at making sense of the words and actions of people we don’t know? Malcolm Gladwell has a well-researched, engrossing answer that includes scientific studies and historical events that illustrate the tools and strategies we use to understand strangers – and why they don’t work. More like a well-produced podcast than a traditional audiobook, it includes a theme song, interviews with scientists and researchers, and recordings of events.

Dreamland by Nancy Bilyeau

“I love Nancy Bilyeau’s ability to show a beautiful story, peppered with a few thrills that keep the reader guessing until the last few pages. Her evocative setting of early 20th century New York is a perfect escapist read!” – Joy, Adult & Teen Services

Peggy Battenberg is more known for her famous last name than for her love of books and independent streak. Born into a high society New York family at the beginning of the 20th century, Peggy falls in love with a humble artist, but her family may behind the mysterious murders that keep happening at the new amusement park of Coney Island, attempting to drive her and her lover apart.

Lucky Boy by Shanthi Sekaran

“This book was recommended to me by one of our patrons, and it was fantastic. The author does an excellent job of creating real characters in this very timely story about immigration. This book is a hidden gem.” – Nancy, Adult & Teen Services 

Solimar is an undocumented Mexican immigrant who crosses the border and arrives in Berkeley, California exhausted and pregnant. Kavya is an American living a comfortable life in Berkeley who struggles to get pregnant. Their lives intersect when Solimar is placed in immigrant detention and Solimar’s son is placed in Kavya’s care.

Dhampir by Barb and J.C. Hendee

“The tagline sold me immediately, “Mix between Lord of the Rings and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.” Don’t let the horrible cover keep you away from this fantasy series.” – Traci, Kids Room

Magiere and her partner, the half-elf Leesil, are ready to hang up their weapons and settle down in a place they can finally call home. But their newfound peace will not last—for Magiere has come to the attention of a trio of powerful and dangerous vampires who know her true identity and they will stop at nothing to keep Magiere from fulfilling her destiny.

You’re Not Listening: What You’re Missing and Why it Matters by Kate Murphy

“It was a fascinating read, but also extremely practical and uplifting, even for those of us who are terrible listeners!” – Joy, Adult & Teen Services

Kate Murphy has done an excellent job explaining how the lack of good listeners in our society is taking a real toll on our ability to form communities of understanding one another. This book had some very practical advice on how to be a better listener and how to form bonds with others by active listening to understand the other rather than to be understood. Example: curiosity. How often do we ask questions because we’re curious about the other person–truly curious? Or ask someone to stop and clarify in a business meeting or department meeting because you didn’t fully understand what they said? Murphy cites several incredible contemporary listeners, crediting their outstanding ability to hear not just what the other person is saying, but also what they are not saying, as indelible to their career success. A must-read!

Legally Blonde, Strictly Ballroom, Baby Boom

“I was looking for something light and funny during these stressful times. All three of these movies, which are available to stream on Hoopla, fit the bill. They made me smile and laugh and provided a nice escape from the events of the outside world.” – Nancy, Adult & Teen Services

A California sorority girl and fashionista heads to Harvard Law (Legally Blonde), an Australian wallflower shines at a ballroom dance competition (Strictly Ballroom), and a high profile New York businesswoman moves to Vermont after inheriting a baby and losing her edge in the New York business world (Baby Boom).

A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles

“Count Rostov, the beating heart of this book, is universally appealing in his humane-ness, his loyalty, his quiet erudition, and his self-effacing charm. Great characters, a surprisingly twisty story, and beautiful language combine to make this a classic!” – Fred, Adult & Teen Services

Talk about your champs of social distancing! In 1922, Count Alexander Rostov is sentenced to house arrest (as an unrepentant aristocrat) by a Bolshevik tribunal. The novel is the story of how he spends the next fifty odd years isolated in a simple attic room in a Moscow hotel. Full of history, character, wit and tenderness – a lot happens in that circumscribed world of his!

Life Will Be the Death of Me…And You Too! by Chelsea Handler

“I’ve followed Handler’s career for years now, and her very in your face, no holds barred, no filter comedy has always been funny. This book, however, is brutally honest, insightful, sensitive, and hilarious. One minute I was laughing, the next minute I was in tears.” – Erin, Kids Room

Comedian Chelsea Handler decides to make some changes in her life and in the world around her. She wants to become more self-sufficient, she wants to work through her anger, and she wants to finally confront the death of her brother.